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13 May 2006 @ 01:22 pm
Do You See What I See?  
I meant  to post something about this a few weeks back, and Pat, in the comments of the post below reminded me, so better late than never!

Perception! We all perceive our favourite shows and movies in our own way, especially if you write fic. How many of us have been told that what we've written isn't canon for one reason or another? [raises hand] And then we go to cons, or watch the extra stuff on DVDs and come to discover that we're not the only ones who see things differently. The actors, the directors, the writers. Everyone seems to have their own take.

I was watching Grey's Anatomy nearly three weeks ago, "Blues for Sister Someone", and there's a scene at the end where Derek finds Meredith at the vet's after hours, dressed in the vet's shirt. Now, that whole scene from the character's POV is misconception, but that's not what I wanted to post about. After, Derek goes home to his wife, whom he's supposedly reconciling with, and asks her if she wants to have 'hot sex'. Now, there's lots going on this scene, but what stood out for me was the fact that he was using his wife because he's still not over Meredith. He was so jealous, he couldn't see straight! But then I'm reading the Grey's writer's blog, and when the writer of the episode is discussing the scene, I get the idea I totally wasn't perceiving it the way she did when she wrote it. Of course, that doesn't mean that the director, or the actors weren't seeing it the way I saw it, so I may have been right on in regards to how I perceived that whole scene. I just found that whole realization, one I could track immediately, not a few years after from a DVD, fascinating. The immediacy of the internet!

Then you have to ask: does the immediacy change the way we will end up looking back on the shows we watch? Would Highlander have been different for us as fanfic writers, and devoted fans, if we'd had immediate contact through writer's blogs and such, of the episodes that had just aired? Would we have been influenced by being told that week that what we thought we saw wasn't there at all? Or would we still blissfully go off on our flights of fancy, not caring?

 These are the things one wonders when one has no life on a Saturday afternoon!

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: curiouscurious
 
 
 
pat: grinpat_t on May 14th, 2006 02:08 pm (UTC)
That's a very good question. And one there may not be an answer for. Because it attaches itself to another question.

If you do read a writer's blog and the writer said I meant this - and then you read an interview with the actor and he says it means something totally different - who is right?

The writer wrote it so he feels ownership and the idea was his. The actor plays the character - delivers the lines - plays the part and becomes that person. If he played the scene a different way from the characters pov he was playing - then he feels ownership of the scene and the characters feelings, emotions and motivations.

Gillian H said many times that Peter came along and totally played a scene differently than it was written and intended. And changed the tone and context completely. So if she had written a blog saying 'I just wrote and episode and this is what it means'- and Peter came along and changed the tone and meaning by how he played Methos - that's how we would see the episode. But who would be right? And maybe someone else read her blog and therefore, already had pre-conceived ideas about what the scene meant before seeing it. Would that change your perceptions?
Ith: Methos Blueithildyn on May 14th, 2006 06:00 pm (UTC)
And even deeper... on a TV show, the person writing the episode may have no connection with the show at all. So are episodes written by the show's creators more 'correct' than an episode written by a random writer? Would the actor's view of the material be more or less weighted depending on who wrote it?

And then! Using Peter - Methos as an example again (go figure) There's the uncut version of the Horseman eps, bits of which were cut for time, especially at the bat cave when it came to Cassandra, that shows Methos is quite a different light. Now, which is it that colours my perception of Methos? I haven't decided yet! :)